what are the rights and responsibilities of a child

Children’s rights are a special case because many of the rights laid down in the convention on the rights of the child have to be provided by adults or the state. However, the convention also refers to responsibilities of children, in particular to respect the rights . Children have the right to enjoy their own culture, religion and language, even if these are not the same as most people in their country. And they have the responsibility to respect other people's culture, religion and language. Published

Estonia joined the convention in The Convention on the Rights of the Child lists internationally acknowledged rights of children. The aim of the adoption of the convention was to emphasize something that adults tend to forget — a child is a human together with all the rights a parent has. The Convention on the Rights of the Child sees child as a subject of law or, to put in another way, as a holder of rights.

Rights of a child are human rights. These are rights which apply to everyone, irrespective of age, gender, nationality or other characteristics. Therefore a how to play ride the bus drinking card game has mostly the same rights that adults have.

Children of different age and gender have various interests and needs. But despite the differences, they have equal rights. All of them have the right to equal treatment. All children have equal rights. In addition to rights, aee also have responsibilities, like adult members of the society. Rights and responsibilities go hand in hand.

A child has a right to free speech, but by exercising one's right to free speech, the child must respect the rights of other children and adults, above all the right to protect one's honour and dignity. The interests of the child must always be the starting point.

As children cannot always protect their rights and interests, they need help and protection from adults. Children have to be protected from mental and physical violence, injustice, negligence, abuse, sexual abuse and other threats. Additionally, adults must ensure that children have what they need to live and establish suitable conditions for the development of children's skills and interests.

The basis for a mutually respectful living environment is mutual respect. Children must respect adults parents, grandparents, kindergarten and school teachers, etc. Mutual respect and responsibilihies of wishes is one of the important premises of the society's coexistence. The Thhe on the Rights of Children lists four general principles: prohibition of unfair treatment, setting the interests of a child as a priority, survival of a child, ensuring a child's development and taking a child's opinions into consideration.

Estonian Union for Child Welfare: Tallinn,pages 11—15, Convention on the Rights of the Child, article 6, section 23; the Constitution, section Every child has an innate right to life and maximum possible i. A parent has a right and an obligation to raise and teach their children and to look after their wellbeing. All children have the right to life and development even those who have a disease or a physical or mental disability. This environment has to be equal to the growing environment a healthy child has.

Many other rights of a child must be ensured rightts the child to develop as much as rlghts, like right what are the rights and responsibilities of a child health protection, right to education, playing and resting.

These are discussed in more detail under other rights. Family is a natural living environment for a child. A parent is the primary person responsible for the child's growth and development. The state must raise and develop children who cannot live in their families, preferably in an like conditions. An environment which what is 600g in cups the child to develop as well as possible means that the child must be guaranteed the best possible childhood.

A child must responsubilities harmonious, loving, happy and understanding growth environment. Right to life and development is the basis to other principles guaranteeing growth, which are included in other articles of how to download on a psp convention.

These discuss the right to education, s, adequate living standard and playtime. These articles of the convention, which protect a child from mistreatment, abuse and the effects of a military conflict, are related with the right respobsibilities life and development. They further the recovery of children who got drawn into such situation and ensure special care and protection to children with disabilities.

Hodgkin, R. Implementation Handbook for the Convention on the Rights of Child. Third ed. Unicef: Genevap 83— Convention on the Rights of the Child, articles 19, 20, 32, 37; the Constitution, sections 18, 28, A child must be protected from any mental and physical violence, injustice, negligence, careless or cruel treatment or exploitation and sexual or other type of abuse. A child like an adult has complete right to dignity. Any kind of whar, not mental or physical, targeted towards children is not justified.

Therefore a child has the right not to be physically mistreated and to be protected from cruel and humiliating treatment. Mistreatment is considered to be torturing, cruel, inhuman or humiliating treatment or punishment. Mental violence is considered to be humiliation, insulting, isolation and other activities, which have an impact on the child's mental health. Humiliating effect can also come from punishment, which is expressed in humiliation, creating a feeling of embarrassment, taunting, injustice, threatening, scaring or ridiculing.

Children with physical and mental disabilities are extremely vulnerable to mental violence. Humiliating treatment is considered to be physical or mental pain or causing suffering with an aim to humiliate another person.

Physical punishment is one type of mistreatment. Physical punishment is considered to be any punishment where physical strength is used and where the aim is to cause any slight or great pain and discomfort.

Physical punishment is considered to be striking or hitting with a tool, but also hair pulling, shaking, throwing, scratching, poking, burning or forced eating. Physical punishment is degrading for a child. Physical or any other degrading treatment can take place in home, at school or in other places.

It does not matter whether the punisher is father, mother, grandmother, grandfather, aunt, uncle, school or kindergarten teacher or someone else — physical or other kind of degrading punishment can never be considered acceptable. Degrading and violent physical and mental behaviour between children is also unacceptable.

A parent should not behave towards a child in a way, which the parent considers to be inappropriate behaviour by others towards the parent. Nevertheless, physical punishment targeted towards children occurs unfortunately in respnsibilities country. Physical punishment of children is justified with traditions, raising methods, but also with protecting the rights of the child. It is in the interest of the child to be protected from any type of violence.

Besides, physical punishment does not help the child to understand, why the activity is forbidden. Physical punishment only teaches through fear to blindly obey commands and demands of a stronger and bigger person. How to make a garden trough depend on adults and they need protection from violence by adults.

The first country to ban physical punishment of children was Sweden, with a Family Act adopted in Adults have a lot to learn on how to punish children.

It is necessary to be able to see the incident through the what age to wean a calf of the child.

Usually, a child's aim is not to behave badly. Mistakes are caused by a lack of knowledge and due to the fact that a child cannot assess situations like an adult. Adults do not have the right to treat children degradingly only because children do not understand the world as adults do. Understanding can be increased with words and attitude. To the child, aree punishment has to seem fair and in proportion with the done deed.

Children desire greatly to be like adults — smart. The task of adults dealing with children is to protect children both from mental and physical violence. This means that adults must stand up for children and inform about occasions when children have been physically punished, physically and mentally mistreated or if there is a chance or there is a doubt.

It is obligatory to inform a child protection official of a local rkghts and in case of need to the police about a child in need of help. One should call to the children's helpline to receive consultation. Received information is forwarded to suitable specialists the police, child protection officials of local municipalities, etc. In the same decision the court has also stated that guaranteeing the observance of principles of the law is done in the interest of the public.

The constitution prohibits adult and child forced labour. Children should not be abused to get work done. The Employment Contracts Act regulates the working of children. A child has the right to social protection, including social insurance.

If parents cannot provide maintenance to a child due to lack of work, illness, special needs, old age, etc.

Therefore the law prescribes various support schemes e. Information on support and services offered to children and families with children by the state can be received responsibipities the local city or rural municipality government or from the children's helpline What is the perfect women is also necessary to have the opinions of doctors and if possible, depending on the age, also the child's opinion.

It might be possible that the situation can be solved with counselling, economic, food or clothes aid. Once the child has been separated from the family, all around support must be continuously provided to the child and to parents, to make it possible for the child to return home. Children must be protected from the use of narcotic and psychotropic substances. Legal, administrative, social and educational measures will be used to guarantee this. It is necessary to have preventive work on the state level to protect children from narcotic and psychotropic substances rfsponsibilities to have treatment and rehabilitation for dependent children.

Unicef: Genevap —, —, —, — Verhellen, E. Convention on the Rights of oof Child. Estonian Union for Child Welfare: Tallinn,page

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The Convention on the Rights of the Child gives the child the right to exercise his/her rights and bear obligations. This means that as the child grows his/her right to decide himself/herself increases and so does the scope of responsibility. Until a child is not able to execute his/her rights, his/her parents or representatives will do it.

The Convention explains who children are, all their rights, and the responsibilities of governments. All the rights are connected, they are all equally important and they cannot be taken away from children.

All children have all these rights, no matter who they are, where they live, what language they speak, what their religion is, what they think, what they look like, if they are a boy or girl, if they have a disability, if they are rich or poor, and no matter who their parents or families are or what their parents or families believe or do. No child should be treated unfairly for any reason. When adults make decisions, they should think about how their decisions will affect children.

All adults should do what is best for children. Governments should make sure children are protected and looked after by their parents, or by other people when this is needed.

Governments should make sure that people and places responsible for looking after children are doing a good job. Governments must do all they can to make sure that every child in their countries can enjoy all the rights in this Convention.

Governments should let families and communities guide their children so that, as they grow up, they learn to use their rights in the best way. The more children grow, the less guidance they will need.

Every child has the right to be alive. Governments must make sure that children survive and develop in the best possible way. Children must be registered when they are born and given a name which is officially recognized by the government. Children must have a nationality belong to a country. Whenever possible, children should know their parents and be looked after by them.

Children have the right to their own identity — an official record of who they are which includes their name, nationality and family relations. No one should take this away from them, but if this happens, governments must help children to quickly get their identity back. Children should not be separated from their parents unless they are not being properly looked after — for example, if a parent hurts or does not take care of a child.

If a child lives in a different country than their parents, governments must let the child and parents travel so that they can stay in contact and be together. Governments must stop children being taken out of the country when this is against the law — for example, being kidnapped by someone or held abroad by a parent when the other parent does not agree.

Children have the right to give their opinions freely on issues that affect them. Adults should listen and take children seriously. Children have the right to share freely with others what they learn, think and feel, by talking, drawing, writing or in any other way unless it harms other people.

Children can choose their own thoughts, opinions and religion, but this should not stop other people from enjoying their rights. Parents can guide children so that as they grow up, they learn to properly use this right. Children can join or set up groups or organisations, and they can meet with others, as long as this does not harm other people.

Every child has the right to privacy. Children have the right to get information from the Internet, radio, television, newspapers, books and other sources. Adults should make sure the information they are getting is not harmful. Governments should encourage the media to share information from lots of different sources, in languages that all children can understand. Parents are the main people responsible for bringing up a child.

Parents and guardians should always consider what is best for that child. Governments should help them. Where a child has both parents, both of them should be responsible for bringing up the child. Governments must protect children from violence, abuse and being neglected by anyone who looks after them. When children are adopted, the most important thing is to do what is best for them.

If a child cannot be properly looked after in their own country — for example by living with another family — then they might be adopted in another country.

Children who move from their home country to another country as refugees because it was not safe for them to stay there should get help and protection and have the same rights as children born in that country.

Every child with a disability should enjoy the best possible life in society. Governments should remove all obstacles for children with disabilities to become independent and to participate actively in the community. Children have the right to the best health care possible, clean water to drink, healthy food and a clean and safe environment to live in.

All adults and children should have information about how to stay safe and healthy. Every child who has been placed somewhere away from home - for their care, protection or health — should have their situation checked regularly to see if everything is going well and if this is still the best place for the child to be. Children have the right to food, clothing and a safe place to live so they can develop in the best possible way.

The government should help families and children who cannot afford this. Every child has the right to an education. Primary education should be free. Secondary and higher education should be available to every child.

Children should be encouraged to go to school to the highest level possible. It should help them to live peacefully and protect the environment. Children have the right to use their own language, culture and religion - even if these are not shared by most people in the country where they live. Every child has the right to rest, relax, play and to take part in cultural and creative activities.

Children have the right to be protected from doing work that is dangerous or bad for their education, health or development. If children work, they have the right to be safe and paid fairly. The government should protect children from sexual exploitation being taken advantage of and sexual abuse, including by people forcing children to have sex for money, or making sexual pictures or films of them. Governments must make sure that children are not kidnapped or sold, or taken to other countries or places to be exploited taken advantage of.

Children have the right to be protected from all other kinds of exploitation being taken advantage of , even if these are not specifically mentioned in this Convention. Children who are accused of breaking the law should not be killed, tortured, treated cruelly, put in prison forever, or put in prison with adults. Prison should always be the last choice and only for the shortest possible time. Children in prison should have legal help and be able to stay in contact with their family.

Children have the right to be protected during war. No child under 15 can join the army or take part in war. Children have the right to get help if they have been hurt, neglected, treated badly or affected by war, so they can get back their health and dignity.

Children accused of breaking the law have the right to legal help and fair treatment. There should be lots of solutions to help these children become good members of their communities.

Prison should only be the last choice. These articles explain how governments, the United Nations — including the Committee on the Rights of the Child and UNICEF - and other organisations work to make sure all children enjoy all their rights. Read and download the Convention on the Rights of the Child — the most widely ratified human rights treaty.

Discover the reasons for singling out children's rights in its own human rights Convention. International standards on child rights have advanced dramatically over the past century — explore the milestones. Find out how much you know about child rights! Programme Menu Convention on the Rights of the Child. Discover the child-friendly version of the Convention on the Rights of the Child:. Download text [PDF]. Resources kit logo and icons.

Convention on the Rights of the Child: The children's version 1. Definition of a child A child is any person under the age of No discrimination All children have all these rights, no matter who they are, where they live, what language they speak, what their religion is, what they think, what they look like, if they are a boy or girl, if they have a disability, if they are rich or poor, and no matter who their parents or families are or what their parents or families believe or do.

Best interests of the child When adults make decisions, they should think about how their decisions will affect children. Making rights real Governments must do all they can to make sure that every child in their countries can enjoy all the rights in this Convention. Family guidance as children develop Governments should let families and communities guide their children so that, as they grow up, they learn to use their rights in the best way. Life survival and development Every child has the right to be alive.

Name and nationality Children must be registered when they are born and given a name which is officially recognized by the government. Identity Children have the right to their own identity — an official record of who they are which includes their name, nationality and family relations.

Keeping families together Children should not be separated from their parents unless they are not being properly looked after — for example, if a parent hurts or does not take care of a child.

Contact with parents across countries If a child lives in a different country than their parents, governments must let the child and parents travel so that they can stay in contact and be together. Protection from kidnapping Governments must stop children being taken out of the country when this is against the law — for example, being kidnapped by someone or held abroad by a parent when the other parent does not agree. Respect for children's views Children have the right to give their opinions freely on issues that affect them.

Sharing thoughts freely Children have the right to share freely with others what they learn, think and feel, by talking, drawing, writing or in any other way unless it harms other people.

Freedom of thought and religion Children can choose their own thoughts, opinions and religion, but this should not stop other people from enjoying their rights. Setting up or joining groups Children can join or set up groups or organisations, and they can meet with others, as long as this does not harm other people.

Protection of privacy Every child has the right to privacy. Access to information Children have the right to get information from the Internet, radio, television, newspapers, books and other sources. Responsibility of parents Parents are the main people responsible for bringing up a child.

Protection from violence Governments must protect children from violence, abuse and being neglected by anyone who looks after them. Children who are adopted When children are adopted, the most important thing is to do what is best for them. Refugee children Children who move from their home country to another country as refugees because it was not safe for them to stay there should get help and protection and have the same rights as children born in that country. Children with disabilities Every child with a disability should enjoy the best possible life in society.

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